Tagged: Alexander Weinstein

Faves of 2016: Fiction

Favorite Books of 2016: Fiction

These were my favorite ten fiction reads of 2016. The first three are my absolute top picks; everything else is listed in alphabetical order.

Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry (1985)

Lonesome Dove remains my biggest shocker: I was extremely reluctant to pick it up, but it ended up being my favorite book of the year (and one of my favorite books, like, ever). At face value, it’s about a ragtag group of cowboys that drives a massive herd of cattle from South Texas to Montana, but it’s also about bigger ideas like duty and friendship and mortality. And it’s a helluva wild adventure.

The Big Green Tent by Ludmila Ulitskaya (2015)

The Big Green Tent is about an unlikely trio that bonds as LORLs — Lovers of Russian Literature — an informal school group led by a popular but subversive teacher. They come of age in 1950s Moscow under the threat of Stalin, where brazen independent thought is dangerous. The book follows the boys throughout the rest of their lives. It’s a modern version of the classic, sweeping Russian novel (but way easier to read).

The Gringo Champion by Aura Xilonen (2017)

I feel kind of weird putting The Gringo Champion on my 2016 list because it won’t be out for a couple more weeks; I got an advance copy. It’s an immigration story that’s unlike any other immigration story I’ve read, in the most surprising and refreshing way. I’ll write more about it on its release day, but I will say now: OMG, the vocabulary in this book is insane! And the author was only nineteen years old when she wrote it!

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Children of the New World: Stories

Book cover: Children of the New World by Alexander WeinsteinSet in the near future, Alexander Weinstein’s collection of speculative fiction explores our increasingly dependent relationship with technology. The characters in these stories openly have affairs via virtual reality, pay people to create memories for them, give birth to e-children and raise their families in an online simulation, and mourn the loss of outdated androids with sophisticated AI. Readers are left to make sense of this weird, sad, innovative high-tech “utopia” Weinstein has built.

I loved it.

The collection opens with “Saying Goodbye to Yang.” A family of four is eating breakfast when one of the children, Yang, begins banging his head into his cereal bowl. The boy is a Big Brother android, purchased to help raise their adopted Chinese daughter with some cultural awareness that her white parents cannot give her. Yang’s subsequent mechanical meltdown is deeply felt by all in ways they never expected; although he’s a machine, he’s always been one of the family.

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