Tagged: Book Riot

Read Harder 2018, Feminist-Style

readharderchallenge2018-768x994Yesterday, Book Riot released the list for their 2018 Read Harder Challenge. In 2016, I began giving feminist recommendations for each task, and I’ve been doing it ever since.

As usual, some of the tasks were trickier to figure out than others. And like last year, you’ll find that a lot of the titles overlap with multiple tasks, but I listed different titles and authors for all tasks. Happy reading!

Task 1: A book published posthumously

  1. Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
  2. Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
  3. The Opposite of Loneliness by Marina Keegan
  4. Suite Française by Irène Némirovsky
  5. Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neal Hurston

Task 2: A book of true crime

  1. American Fire by Monica Hesse
  2. The Fact of a Body by Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich
  3. Mrs. Sherlock Holmes by Brad Ricca
  4. Murder in Matera by Helene Stapinski
  5. The Hot One by Carolyn Murnick

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Read Harder 2017, Feminist-Style

Read Harder Challenge logo 2017Last year, one of the tasks for Book Riot’s Read Harder challenge was to read a feminist book. I saw how people seemed to be stuck in a rut, listing the same books over and over, so I came up with feminist book recommendations for every task in the 2016 challenge.

The 2017 Read Harder tasks were announced a few days ago, and I’ve been mulling these topics over ever since. So what the heck…here are 100+ more feminist book recommendations that should cover most of the tasks (alas, I’m afraid I can’t recommend a book you’ve already read as I am not a mind reader). The micropress task had me stumped for a while, but I got that one too. And hey! For those of you panicking about your library acquiring a micropress book, an added bonus: Native Realities offers Deer Woman for free as an ebook download! Am I good or what?

A lot of titles overlap with other tasks, but each author is only listed once. Happy reading!

Task 1: Read a book about sports.

  1. Course Correction: A Story of Rowing and Resilience in the Wake of Title IX by Ginny Gilder
  2. Game, Set, Match: Billie Jean King and the Revolution in Women’s Sports by Susan Ware
  3. Getting in the Game: Title IX and the Women’s Sports Revolution by Deborah L. Brake
  4. Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town by Jon Krakauer
  5. Unsportsmanlike Conduct: College Football and the Politics of Rape by Jessica Luther

Task 2: Read a debut novel.

  1. 13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl by Mona Awad
  2. The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
  3. Cinder by Marissa Meyer
  4. Here Comes the Sun by Nicole Dennis-Benn
  5. The Orchardist by Amanda Coplin

Task 3: Read a book about books.

  1. Ex Libris: Confessions of a Common Reader by Anne Fadiman
  2. Girl Sleuth: Nancy Drew and the Women Who Created Her by Melanie Rehak
  3. The Possessed: Adventures With Russian Books and the People Who Read Them by Elif Batuman
  4. Reading Lolita in Tehran by Azar Nafisi
  5. Tolstoy and the Purple Chair: My Year of Magical Reading by Nina Sankovitch

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Read Harder 2016, Feminist-Style

Erm, well this is awkward. I was supposed to post my fave nonfiction reads of 2015 today, but…I forgot to finish that post and I’m about to spend the next 6 hours driving to Austin. I’ll post that list tomorrow. In the meantime, chew on this! I’m bumping it up the schedule just for you!

So. I completed Book Riot’s Read Harder challenge in 2015, and, being a total nerd, figured out my list for 2016 within hours of the categories being posted. This year, feminism is on the list. YAY, right? But as I was figuring out my own list, I kept seeing how many of the books I was considering overlapped with the feminist category. And then I started seeing, via the Goodreads boards and hashtags, what other people were choosing. That’s all part of the fun.

But is it me, or is everyone stuck in a feminist rut? The main titles being bandied about are:

  • We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (good book!)
  • Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay (good book!)
  • Men Explain Things to Me by Rebecca Solnit (good book!)
  • How to Be a Woman by Caitlin Moran (PLEASE GOD NO WHYYYYY)

That’s cool (Moran’s book notwithstanding). In the world of feminist publications, those do seem to be the heavy hitters of the past few years, and it’s great that people are seeking them out (Moran’s book notwithstanding). It’s just that there’s a huuuuuuuge world of feminist literature out there. So huge, in fact, that a feminist analysis can be applied to every single category.

Every. Single. Category.

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